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How Do Workers’ Compensation Settlements In Boston Work?

People can get injured in countless ways at work. Various and many types of personal injuries can be caused by accidents at work. If you were injured at work in Massachusetts, and the insurance company has been paying you weekly workers’ compensation checks, then it may make sense to settle your work injury case. A settlement in this context is called a lump sum settlement. These  settlements are either made on a “with liability” basis, or “without liability” basis.

If the settlement is “with liability” that means the insurance company, besides agreeing to pay you a sum of money, also agrees to pay for all reasonable, necessary and related medical treatment. The attorney fee, which is set by law, is 20% of the total settlement in this situation.

This means that for the rest of your life, if you need to receive medical treatment for the injuries sustained in the accident, the insurance company must pay for it. If they do not, then a claim can be filed against them.

These settlements also allow the injured worker to apply for vocational rehabilitation and will qualify if he meets certain criteria. If a case is settled “without liability” then the insurance company does not agree to pay for future medical care. In these cases the attorney fee set by law is 15% of the total settlement.

Once the injured worker’s Boston workers compensation attorney has settled the case, it must then be approved by a judge at the Department of Industrial Accidents. The judge will hear from the lawyers as to why the settlement should be approved, and will then review the lump sum settlement papers all accurately put forth the terms of the settlement.

Boston Workers Compensation Settlement Lawyer

Contact today the Law Office of Christopher Earley if you need help with a workers comp injury claim in Massachusetts. We always offer free consultations, and be sure to check out our free consumer guide, The Truth About Massachusetts Workers Compensation Accidents.